Cooking with kid: Adobo hocks

Hocks (the lower part of the leg) are not inherently the most tender cuts of meat from an animal, goat or otherwise. One of the tricks to cooking one’s way through an entire animal—as I am doing for this “Cooking with kid” series—is learning to use those “lower quality” cuts to yield meals that are every bit as delicious and satisfying as ones made with the fancier pieces. A Filipino-style adobo does just that, yielding a rich garlic-vinegar-pepper-infused meat that is melt-in-your-mouth delicious. The preparation is great for the tougher cuts from kids, any cut of an old goat, and also for old hens or even stringy old roosters. Adobo is one of Eric’s favorite methods of preparing meat, and the results are always so tasty I tend to think of it as a complicated meal. But now I know: This is an easy preparation that should be in every omnivore’s repertoire.

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Cooking with kid: Koftas

kofta_mealWe don’t make Indian food as often as we’d like, so for this installment of “Cooking with kid” I decided to address my goals of culinary diversity by tackling koftas (spiced meatballs). Although ground meat has already been featured in Burgers and Tacos, it’s a practical way to use less-than-ideal cuts, and we always enjoy the results. This meal ended up being the most stressful to prepare of the entire series to date, but the end result was nice. Perhaps I’ll tell the full story in a different post, but for now here’s the simple version.

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Cooking with kid: Hocks in groundnut stew

This is the time of year to use meat as a condiment to vegetables. Produce is abundant, but as cooler weather sets in, hearty soups and stews begin to to return to our menu. So, for my most recent “cooking with kid” meal, I decided to use one of Eric’s favorite tricks: add meat to a beloved vegetarian recipe. (By the way, check out our new “Cooking with Kid” index page to learn more about this Joanna-cooks-a-goat project.)

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Cooking with kid: Stir fry with tenderloin

Tenderloins are lovely pieces of meat, as tender as the name implies. They are located along the backbone, internal to the body cavity, so you can’t reach around and feel your own like you can loin/backstrap. Removing this cut from the carcass is a bit awkward, and sure enough when butchering the goat kid featured in this cooking series, I managed to put a big knife cut through of one of them. The tenderloins are long and skinny, and those from a kid are on the small side: Crystal’s were about a half pound (including two thin strips, not photographed, that may or may not “officially” be tenderloin). What would I do with smallish pieces of meat, tender and suitable for quick high-heat cooking, with a pretty bad gash though the middle of one? Stir fry seemed a sensible answer.

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Cooking with kid: Loin #1, grilled in celebration of spring

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Loins  are the muscles on the sides of the spine. Yes, go ahead, reach around to your back, find your backbone, and feel the muscle on either side. That’s the piece. This is one of the high-end cuts from any mammal. For example, from a pig, it can become a pork chop (if sliced through the bone). In deer, it is often called backstrap. From a goat, we just call it the loin, and in our butchering style, we generally carefully cut it off of the spine, resulting in a nice boneless piece of meat. This a cut that is suitable for quick, high heat cooking. We like to make a point of doing something nice with the loins.

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Cooking with kid: Sauerbraten with shoulder #2

Editor’s note: This was written in late winter, but delayed due to various circumstances. The next post in this series will be a new, current one and hopefully the series stays up to date from now on.

In honor of my German heritage, I decided that sauerbraten should be in my cooking repertoire, as I enjoy it when prepared by Eric. So, in spite of my plan to minimize “meat and potatoes” meals in this series, I decided to embrace and feature that combination…this time. Why? For a culturally complete meal, I wanted to serve the sauerbraten with potato pancakes, another German specialty that I make routinely. Our dwindling storage potato supply suggested that I either make this now or wait until July, the earliest more potatoes could be ready for harvest. Sauerbraten in July doesn’t sound as appealing, so I opted to prioritize this as a nice winter meal.

Although my parents have handwritten recipes for sauerbraten from my grandmother, I simply went for our cookbook shelf and took guidance from the recipe in Mimi Sheraton’s The German Cookbook, our favorite resource for traditional German cooking. I followed the recipe moderately closely, though of course it calls for beef rather than goat. What matters is the braising theme, and the basic components of this technique are quickly becoming familiar: brown the meat, saute some aromatics, add some liquid, put it all together, and slow cook. The twists here are that sauerbraten starts with a specific marinade, and final preparations include making gravy.

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Cooking with kid: Shoulder #1, dry vs. moist heat

After a bit of an interlude due to some travel and other distractions, I’m returning to the (goat) kid cooking series. Readers who are in tune with seasonal eating will quickly notice that the meals described here happened some time ago, back when storage onions were still in good condition, and prior to the season when we’ve started eating greenery from the fields again. This piece and the next (which will go up in a few days) describe late winter meals featuring Crystal’s front shoulders. The remainder of the kid is still happily in the freezer, and I intend to resume kid cooking (and timely blogging) quite soon.

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