Visit us at Columbia’s Earth Day, Sunday April 26

Note: The Columbia Earth Day event has been postponed to April 26.

For the second year, we’ll be hosting a booth at Columbia’s Earth Day festival. Last year, we won the organization’s Best For-Profit Booth award. We are looking forward to another enjoyable experience, this time with a location on Eco Avenue, the heart of Earth Day, located on Elm St between 7th & 8th St.

This year we intend to have a variety of interesting reasons to stop by, including:

  • Kid-friendly, hands-on interpretive displays of natural items from the farm.
  • Wood products for sale, including garden-bed frame kits and birdhouses built to Audubon standards, all made from cedar wood cut and milled on-farm.
  • Signups for notification of produce available later in the season, including strawberries and garlic.
  • Small packets of Mercuri tomato seeds, a rare heirloom tomato that come from a friend’s Canadian-Italian family. These are winter-storage tomatoes; they will not beat most summer tomatoes in fresh flavor, but will store for months in your pantry, giving you fresh tomatoes long after the growing season is over (and saving significant canning work). They are prolific, hardy, and disease-resistant. We offer these through the Seed Savers Exchange network, but will make them available at Earth Day as a way to encourage home gardening and local food consumption.
  • We may have small amounts of herbs or other produce for sale. This will be a last-minute decision.

Here are photos of some prototype wood products we’ll be offering. Top photo, from left to right, wren house, bluebird house, phoebe shelf. Bottom photo, 3’x4′ garden bed frame. Finished product will be screwed together at the joints, ready to be filled with soil/compost and planted. Also available, 4’x4′ squares. Cedar lumber resists rot very well and will last many years as a bed frame. These are also good for framing young trees.
birdhouses garden_frame

We both plan to attend this year, so stop by, check out the displays, chat about eco-friendly diversified farming, consider adding a birdhouse or garden bed to your home, and help make this another great Earth Day!

Bird list & natural events, March 2015

We were away for part of March, so the bird list has a few gaps in it, and there aren’t many photos to share. This provides us with an opportunity to ask readers for some feedback on our monthly natural events posts.

We started this series many years ago with several goals: to help us track observations and changes in our surroundings, to demonstrate that farming can happen in concert with environmental awareness, and to engage customers in the natural context of their food’s source. We hoped we would gain and retain customers who wanted to support farmers who paid attention to the natural world, and weren’t “just” farmers. Putting these posts together, though generally enjoyable, does take a fair amount of time and focus. It’s not clear to us how many customers or readers really value the result. We can keep track of birds, photos, and observations off-line, too, so if there isn’t a concrete value to the extra work of packaging these data onto the web, we’re questioning how or whether to keep doing it. So we’re interested in hearing any feedback on the content, format, or value of these posts to anyone who’s reading. Comments or emails are fine. In the meantime, read on for March 2015. Continue reading

Pesticide drift article in Growing for Market

The April issue of Growing for Market, a national “trade publication for local food producers”, carries an article we wrote about farmers handling pesticide drift incidents. It briefly tells two stories of recent drift contamination in central Missouri (our own experience and that of Terra Bella Farm), and presents ways farmers can prepare for handling or preventing such an event. If you’re not a Growing for Market subscriber but want to read the article, individual issues can  be ordered in print or digital format.

For readers of GFM who have found our site after reading the article, you can read more about our specific experience in this three-part blog series: Part I, Part II, & Part III. We hope the article is helpful to others in preparing for this increasing threat, and welcome any feedback, comments, or stories you may want to share.

Do NOT make this recipe at home!

So many recipes suffer from unnecessary precision, pressuring home cooks to buy ingredients they don’t need. On the other hand, a lot of great food can’t easily be prepared with a recipe because there isn’t any one way to make it. Here’s a tasty leftovers concoction we made recently that, if written up as a recipe, perfectly captures the absurdity of precision in a creative kitchen. Continue reading

Cooking with kid: Heart and tongue

We consider heart and tongue to be delicacies. I don’t remember ever encountering these on a plate before we started raising and eating our own animals, but I had no problem learning to love them. Both are muscles, and don’t convey the strong innard-y smells and flavors that challenge my quest to love liver. However, as very specialized muscles, their textures differ from each other and those of other muscles, and so certain preparations are preferable.

heart_and_tongue

The photos above show the tongue and heart of the goat kid featured in this series. For the preparations described here, I also used the heart and tongue of a second kid that we butchered on the same day.

Continue reading

Birding class this spring at Eagle Bluffs

In April we’ll be offering a chance to learn more about central Missouri birding, with a one-day class through the Columbia Area Career Center. This is a great chance to explore Eagle Bluffs, one of the region’s top bird conservation areas, and gain some practical skills in bird identification and appreciation. Here’s the catalog description (p. 45) followed by some more detail about our goals for the class; we hope to have an enthusiastic group and cooperative weather! If interested, register through the Career Center.

SONY DSC

Basic Birding Skills

Saturday, 4/11/15, 8:00 – noon

Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area is a birding gem in Columbia’s backyard. We’ll explore its various habitats, practice observational and listening skills, and consider bird behavior. No experience necessary, only a desire to discover what makes birding so popular!

Course description: In a hands-on natural setting, students will explore how to observe and listen to a wide variety of birds, understand and analyze their habitats and behaviors, and otherwise gain basic skills that can be applied to birding in any location. Course is intended to teaching birding skills in the field rather than bird identification per se, though we expect attendees will come away more familiar with specific birds than when they arrived. For example, we will practice observing and recording specific features of birds that can be used for later identification, rather than trying to identify birds on the fly. Overall, we want students to see some neat birds, enjoy a morning of nature observation, and come away with new confidence and birding skills.

Presenter biography: We are members of the Columbia Audubon Society, and experienced observers of birds across central Missouri and on our own diverse farm. Joanna is a lifelong birder from a birding family, while Eric holds a Masters in Teaching and has extensive experience in public science education.

Sustainable Table: Our kitchen-management class this spring

In April we’ll be teaching a kitchen-management course through the Columbia Area Career Center. We’ve long practiced and espoused a form of whole-kitchen management that integrates creative cooking with using seasonal items that are available and on hand, without being overly time-consuming or fussy. A good example is the “Preparing a CSA share in an hour” demonstration we gave last year, which showed how easy it can be to turn an full-share of farm-fresh produce into simple, delicious, and wholesome dishes.

Here’s the catalog description (p. 44) followed by a more detailed outline of our curriculum and goals, drawn from our initial proposal to CACC. Please considering sharing this with anyone you know who might be interested, or even signing up yourself!

Sustainable Table

Tuesdays 4/14 – 5/12, 7:00 – 8:30 pm

Getting the most out of your ingredients and your budget requires flexibility in menu-planning along with creativity and improvisation in the kitchen. Explore ways to source and prepare meals that are simple, delicious and economical. (5 Sessions)

Skills to be gained: Students will learn how to: find and choose fresh ingredients; assess and adapt recipes to match their supplies & needs; use seasonal menus and food preservation to improve their food budget; and explore kitchen techniques and items that can benefit their cooking & time budget.

Presenter biography: We have been honing our cooking skills for over 15 years, first as farmers market shoppers and CSA members, then as professional producers of fresh ingredients at Chert Hollow Farm in northern Boone County. Eric also holds a Masters degree in teaching and has extensive experience with public speaking and education.

Outline of learning activities per session:

  1. Sourcing ingredients: Discussions of seasonality, growing methods, sources of ingredients, what to ask farmers or grocers, ways to identify better or worse ingredients, storage and preservation methods.
  2. Recipe analysis: What makes a good or bad recipe, how to rewrite or adapt a recipe to be easier or faster to follow, how different ingredients contribute to a recipe, how to swap or supplement ingredients.
  3. Master recipes: Step away from specific recipes and discuss the structure of different classes of meals. What defines a soup, a pasta, a stir fry, a sauce? How can we develop a master recipe that can be adapted to whatever ingredients are on hand?
  4. Kitchen management: Ways to use your kitchen more efficiently, including advance preparation, recipe doubling, appropriate shortcuts, spreading preparation over multiple days vs. a scheduled cooking binge.
  5. Budgeting & valuing food: Economics of how food is produced, sold, and purchased, minimizing waste, efficient approaches to sourcing ingredients, analysis of personal and general food budgets, buying in bulk vs. not over-purchasing.